Knife Care

Caring for your knife will help ensure a lifetime of use. Koivu Knives are each one-of-a-kind, and throughout their use continue to grow in character. Below we debunk some common myths and provide a short how-to for knife care and sharpening.


MYTH
Knives are difficult to sharpen.

IN ACTUALITY
The notion that knives are difficult to sharpen has largely followed the modern introduction of stainless steel knives, as they take considerable lengths of time and are in fact harder to sharpen by hand. However, carbon steel blades are much easier to sharpen than the stainless steel variety. All Koivu Knives are carbon steel, and we are excited to re-unite people with the lost skill of hand sharpening their own kitchen knives.


MYTH
The better a knife is the less frequently it will need sharpening.

IN ACTUALITY
A knife maker gets decide on the hardness of metal through the production process, and and different knife styles should be set to different hardnesses. Some of the thicker Japanese blades are set very hard so they will hold a edge for a long time, but the hardness of the blade makes it more brittle and more likely to become damaged if it comes into contact with harder materials like bones or seeds. On the other hand, a French Sabatier with its higher degree of flexibility will have a lower hardness to prevent the blade from snapping as it flexes during use. The result is a light nimble blade that will not chip but will need sharpening more often. Some chefs even sharpen their knives daily to maintain the level of sharpness that they desire!


THE PATINA
We use carbon steels on all of our knives, keeping the link between the old and the new, showcasing heritage through materials while creating a new story. Carbon steel is know as a reactive steel. Knives made from reactive steels react with the food that they come into contact with. The aesthetics of the blade will evolve over time to show the traits and characteristics of the knive’s user and the foods they love. With different foods and acids come different colours and tones. The more acidic the food and the longer it is exposed to the steel, the darker the patina will become. If for any reason you don’t like the way a patina has formed on your blade you can take it back to a blank canvas and start again.


KNIFE SHARPENING GUIDE